Not Your Typical Tourist

A Life Between Two Countries, And All In Between

Thailand

Omakase at Koko Japanese Restaurant

Open-minded is key in enjoying an omakase meal, and it is best to leave the critical-self at home. Leaving it to the chef is not for everyone, including the right amount of wasabi onto each piece of sushi. And some questions are best asked to serving staff, then to the chef who’s already busy preparing the dishes live for you.

My first omakase meal was back in Nov 2020 at Mini Me by Fillets, which serves a small group of 9 diners max at one time with two chef. After my first omakase meal, I was rather critical of my second experience .. well, I thought one meal made me an expert (not!). While writing this post, I reminded myself that omakase is really entrusting the chef to serve what they want, in their own way. And if it’s only 1k+ baht course, then we should manage our expectation accordingly.

Koko Japanese Restaurant was selected for our year-end team meal, and we only have 1,200 baht budget per pax. When I found out that an omakase meal has been arranged with that budget, I was rather sceptical. Will that be top-notch ingredient, how will the experience be in a big group environment with food being prepared live serving 11 pax simultaneously? I clearly remember how the chef at Mini Me by Fillets was very particular about less photo, eat instantly for that crisp seaweed fresh from packaging – will the chef be able to maintain that with so many mouths to feed?

Arriving early at the restaurant, I was pleased that a private room (Koko VIP room) has been arranged for our group. But to my horror, there was only one chef assigned to the group and I immediately took pity on him. Not only that I thought it’s short-handed, he also had to take a lot of questions (incl. are there are other branches, and his employment history)! and demand for story behind the dishes. I have very high respect for his patience as he still delivered the dishes with smile and humour when necessary.

In comparison with my first omakase experience, I thought this time round it’s more gimmicky and less about (freshness of) the ingredients. I was alarmed from course 1, with chawanmushi being served in a ‘bird cage’ and also seeing gold dust spraying and being told to eat straight from the palm for the Akami course. Gimmicky or not, that gold dust dish is my favorite once I leave the critical side of me behind. Some of my colleagues also like the hotate yaki, but I thought it’s too much unnecessary frills (aka topping) .. My least favorite is the unagi tempura – it seems that there is no unagi taste to it because it has been deep-fried … then what’s the point of eating unagi?

Will I come back again to the restaurant? Yes to accompany friends with a limited budget and wanting to try omakase, and no if budget is not an issue … there are raving reviews by many bloggers, so perhaps I am too picky ..

Beginner Course
11 Courses

  1. Chawanmushi
  2. Ama Ebi Kani Miso Don
  3. Madai (sea bream) sushi
  4. Hamachi (yellowtail) sushi
  5. Kanpachi (yellowtail mid-maturity) sushi
  6. Ebi Karasumi (prawn + dried mullet roe)
  7. Hotate Yaki (scallop)
  8. Akami Zuke (marinated tuna)
  9. Unagi Tempura
  10. Akadashi Soup
  11. Tamago Bate and Melon

There are four slots: 12.00 | 15.00 | 17.00 | 19.00

Beginner ฿999++ (11 Courses) Mon-Fri 12:00,15:00
Silver ฿1,499++ (14 Courses) Mon-Fri 12:00,15:00
Gold ฿1,799++ (17 Courses)
Edo-mae ฿2,199++ (18 Courses)(Best Seller)
Winter Exclusive ฿2,599++ (18 Courses)(Seasonal)

KOKO JAPANESE RESTAURANT
54, Sathorn Soi 4, North Sathorn Rd., P1, Harindhorn Tower, Khwaeng Silom, Khet Bang Rak, Bangkok
LINE Official : @kokojapanese or Call : 02-1157628 , 082-069-5569
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KOKOJAPANESE/
Public Transport: MRT Lumpini or BTS Chong Nongsi
[ TUESDAY – SUNDAY ] **MONDAY CLOSED **

Writer

Travel opens up a whole new world, which is cliche but true. I am a strong advocate for independent and solo travel. I was born and raised in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia but now live in Bangkok, Thailand, resulted from a chance encounter in 2009 with my why-are-you-Thai bf. I am now split between two countries. One country for my bf, another for the family, for the occasional weekend together.